Ron Sexsmith Sings “Maybe This Christmas”

maybe_this_christmas_album_coverListen to this song, by the almost unfairly talented singer-songwriter Ron Sexsmith, “Maybe This Christmas”, which is a seasonal tune as featured on The O.C Christmas Album, from the TV show of the same name.

Sexsmith is a giant among his  peers, if not the wider record buying world.  Elvis Costello, Feist, k.d lang, and Paul McCartney are fans, among many others.  This might be because  his songs deliver often complex ideas in digestible form, yet never come off as being simplistic.  And he seems to be able to translate this ability into nearly every tune and every genre he sets his mind to.

In this song, we get our Christmas spirit payoff in much the same manner. We  get something about the state of the world too,  a less-than-ideal state at that.  But, it’s tuneful, and the lyrics are heartfelt,  not preachy.

The Christmas story, whether you buy all the hype on a religious level or not, is still a pretty powerful one either way.  I think ultimately the point of it was that even in the middle of struggles, in having to make due with inhospitable conditions like traveling while pregnant and bunking down with livestock before delivering your baby, there is ultimately a need to celebrate the hope that the world is not lost as long as we believe there’s enough good in it from which to draw meaning.  When I think of the ‘Christmas spirit’, I think it’s this idea that shines through most. And in this, Sexsmith has captured the intent of every Christmas tune.

So warm your feet by the fire, and of course…

Enjoy!

Keith Richards Sings Chuck Berry’s “Run Rudolph Run”

kr_runrudolphrun_0Here’s a clip featuring “Keef the Human Riff” Keith Richards rocking out his hero Chuck Berry’s seasonal hit “Run Rudolph Run”.  This may seem like something of a novelty of course.  But, technically this was Keith’s  first single as a solo artist, releasing it around this time in 1978.  He wouldn’t take on another solo project for another decade.

Richards debt to Chuck Berry from the formation of the Rolling Stones was a big one in terms of style and approach.  But, no one could suggest that the group hadn’t paid Berry back in royalties.  The Stones covered many Berry hits, including “Carol”, “Bye Bye Johnny”, “Little Queenie”, and of course “Come On” which was their very first single in 1963.

Maybe this seems like a lightweight entry for a debut solo single. But, I like to think that Keith was doing this one for the kids.  And it does rock, in a wasted sort of way.  What else would you expect from Keith?

The original Berry version of “Run Rudolph Run”  was released twenty years before Richards’ take, and has since been recorded by a myriad of artists like Dave Edmunds, Sheryl Crow, Reverend Horton Heat, and of course the inescapable Bryan Adams.

Enjoy!