The Dirty Nil (Photo: Bailey Northcott)

Listen to this track, a double-A side single from Southern Ontarian rock ‘n’ roll upstarts The Dirty Nil. It’s the rip-up-the-seats anthems “Fuckin’ Up Young/Verona Lung”.

If your workplace includes members of the clergy, you might want to put on your headphones, good people.

A drums (Kyle Fisher) bass (Dave Nardi) guitar (Luke Bentham, who also sings) trio, the guys have recorded EPs, cut vinyl singles (like this one), played shows, and have been named Best New Band at the Hamilton Music Awards starting in 2008. A part of the vibrant indie scene in Hamilton, Ontario, the band revel in their own brand of gritty, garagey rock music, while acknowledging the eclectic musical landscape in Hamilton of which they are a part.

Among other things, I talked to the Luke and Dave about cutting the single, about being indie and going pro, and about the the important fuel that guns the engines of many a rock ‘n’ roll band – beer.

***

The Delete Bin: There have a bunch of anthems about ‘fuckin’ up young’ in the annals of rock ‘n’ roll history. You’ve gone and written a song actually called that. How much of this is just a sing-a-long meant for a live crowd, and how much is this tune an anthem for the times?

Luke Bentham: We’re flattered if anyone’s able to identify with the song, but frankly there wasn’t that much thought given to it while we were writing it. We just sort of struck upon those words and thought they sounded cool. We weren’t really striving to create any sort of anthem. Not on purpose anyways.

DB: Tell me a little bit about how these tunes were recorded. How did you know when you had what you wanted?

Dave Nardi: We made the record in a cabin up north, in between episodes of Destroyed in Seconds. We just set up a bunch of mics and amps in the bedrooms and bathrooms, with the drums in the kitchen. Then we brought it all back to Hamilton and recorded the vocals and mixed it. I think we all had a pretty concrete idea of what we were going for as far as the sound was concerned. So it was pretty easy to tell when we’d achieved it.

DB: The idea of a “double A side” is kind of a misnomer these days. It’s all digital; there aren’t any “sides”. How do you see yourselves as a band putting your stuff across in the digital world?

DN: Well we’re actually putting it out at as a 7″ single. The digital aspect was sort of an afterthought really. It’s something that you still have to do to make sure your music gets into as many hands as possible. But it’s nice that we can still make a vinyl record and know that there’s people out there that have interest in buying it. The digital world is just a pesky formality.

DB: You guys started the band  young from high school, just as something to have fun with. At what point did you decide that this was a permanent thing, and something worth building professionally?

LB: We always took it very seriously, right from the beginning. I still don’t know that there’s been a moment where we’ve decided that this band has become our lives. It’s always just been unspoken that this band is the most important thing. From the beginning the band has always been a daily thing. And we didn’t really see any reason to change that.

DB: This time last year, you guys had made an impression on the Hamilton scene as a live band, and put out some EPs. What have been some key events since then that have helped to build momentum for the next level?

DN:  I think that when we first started making this record, it really energized us. That, and going on tour again, were two primary things that have sort of strengthened our resolve to keep going.

DB: Many bands seek the major record label deal, where others see that as giving up that indie spirit that inspired them start with. Where do you guys sit on this split?

From Left: Kyle, Luke, and Dave of the Dirty Nil. (Photo: Bailey Northcott)

LB: We’re not anti-success. But, we’re not at a point yet in our career where we’re willing to compromise our values for anyone. We’re happy right now with the way things are progressing naturally for us and it’d be foolish to try to force some kind of success that could potentially come at the cost of that happiness.

DB: The Hamilton scene is, by all accounts, pretty tight; very diverse, and very supportive. How have you guys benefited from being a part of it, and are there any specific bands on the scene that you have an affinity with?

DN: The Hamilton scene is fantastic. There’s something I think we’ve always enjoyed about playing a show and looking out at the audience and being able to spot a dozen or so people from a bunch of local bands. It’s just super reassuring I think that everyone’s so willing to support each other, and so genuinely excited about what everyone else is doing.

Cam Malcolm from Huron is a good friend. We’ve been playing together quite a bit. We’re playing a show this week as his backing band, which will be cool. Hopefully we’ll get to do that more. Adam Bentley from The Rest is a great friend too. He’s been helping us out a lot in putting out this record. Both really great dudes. But really, theres no-one in Hamilton that isn’t willing to help out another band in some way.

DB: In reading about you guys a bit, I get the impression that the sound of the band is something you guys talk about almost in the third person, as if you’re following its lead, rather than making a strategy around how you want to sound. Do you feel that you’re ‘using the Force’ a bit when it comes to developing, and putting across, your material?

LB: If by the force, you mean beer, then yes; we drink a lot of beer.

DB: I’m at a The Dirty Nil show. What can I expect from you guys on stage?

DN: Did we mention we drink a lot of beer?  It’s loud usually. Pretty loud. And I usually fall over at least once. And everyone’s really sweaty. Someone might bleed.

***

Thanks, guys!

For more information about The Dirty Nil, be sure to “Like” The Dirty Nil on Facebook, and follow the Dirty Nil on Twitter.

To check out more music, investigate The Dirty Nil MySpace page.

Enjoy!

Advertisements

What are your thoughts, Good People? Tell it to me straight.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s